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Started: 9/7/2021 4:12 AM
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Holiday Trimmings Can Be Toxic to Kids

The mistletoe, the holly, the tinsel on the tree: they may seem magical to children ... but they can also be toxic. Learn which holiday decorations to keep safely out of the reach of children and pets.

The sights and smells of the season can be dangerously tempting to the very young. Many holiday decorations can be toxic to children and pets. Know the signs and symptoms of poisoning. If you see them, get medical help immediately.

Bringing the outdoors indoors
From Christmas trees to mistletoe, eating the leaves or berries of plants that are brought inside your home can - at the very least - make children and pets sick. Some can be deadly.

  • Holly berries: These bright red berries aren't fatal, but eating more than one or two can cause nausea, vomiting, stomach pain and diarrhea in children and pets.
  • Mistletoe: The leaves and berries of mistletoe are highly toxic. Eating one or two berries isn't harmful. More than that causes vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain and possibly even seizures and death. If eaten by pets, shock and death can occur within hours.
  • Poinsettia: It's a myth that poinsettias are poisonous. Eating lots of poinsettia leaves could cause mild stomach upset. The plant's sap can also cause a skin rash.
  • Jerusalem cherry: This bright orange plant with red berries is toxic. Besides nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, symptoms may include drowsiness, restlessness, skin redness and hallucinations. In rare cases, seizures may occur.
  • Pine needles: If large amounts are eaten, pine needles can be toxic. In small amounts, stomach irritation can occur.
  • Boxwood: This plant, commonly used in wreaths, can cause severe stomach problems, seizures and respiratory failure.

Decorating dangers

  • Icicles and tinsel: If swallowed, these can irritate the digestive system. They may contain lead and tin, which can be toxic if swallowed repeatedly. In addition, they can cause stomach blockages in dogs and cats.
  • Fireplace crystals: These colorful crystals look like candy, but can contain harmful metals like copper and arsenic. If swallowed, they can irritate the mouth and stomach, and burn the mouth and throat. Swallowing large amounts can cause heavy metal poisoning.
  • Gift wrap: Some foil and colored gift wraps contain lead. Don't let your baby chew on them.

Other holiday hazards

  • Batteries: Don't let children play with disc batteries that are used in watches, cameras and games. If swallowed, they can stick to the throat or stomach, causing serious burns as the acid leaks out. If dogs chew on batteries, they too can get acid burns in their mouths.
  • Alcohol: Alcohol poisoning increases during the holidays. Don't leave partially filled glasses where kids can reach them.
  • Cigars and cigarettes: Even if you live in a smoke-free house, you may decide to make an exception Vilitra for holiday guests. Children have eaten whole cigarettes and cigars, as well as cigar and cigarette butts. This can cause vomiting, sweating and seizures. Keep all ashtrays out of the reach of curious little hands.
  • Chocolate: Too much chocolate isn't good for kids, though hardly toxic. It's different for pets, though. Chocolate can be fatal to animals, especially dogs. If you notice vomiting, nervousness, loss of balance, seizures or coma, get immediate medical attention for your pet.


The mistletoe, the holly, the tinsel on the tree: they may seem magical to children ... but they can also be toxic. Learn which holiday decorations to keep safely out of the reach of children and pets.

The sights and smells of the season can be dangerously tempting to the very young. Many holiday decorations can be toxic to children and pets. Know the signs and symptoms of poisoning. If you see them, get medical help immediately.

Bringing the outdoors indoors
From Christmas trees to mistletoe, eating the leaves or berries of plants that are brought inside your home can - at the very least - make children and pets sick. Some can be deadly.

  • Holly berries: These bright red berries aren't fatal, but eating more than one or two can cause nausea, vomiting, stomach pain and diarrhea in children and pets.
  • Mistletoe: The leaves and berries of mistletoe are highly toxic. Eating one or two berries isn't harmful. More than that causes vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain and possibly even seizures and death. If eaten by pets, shock and death can occur within hours.
  • Poinsettia: It's a myth that poinsettias are poisonous. Eating lots of poinsettia leaves could cause mild stomach upset. The plant's sap can also cause a skin rash.
  • Jerusalem cherry: This bright orange plant with red berries is toxic. Besides nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, symptoms may include drowsiness, restlessness, skin redness and hallucinations. In rare cases, seizures may occur.
  • Pine needles: If large amounts are eaten, pine needles can be toxic. In small amounts, stomach irritation can occur.
  • Boxwood: This plant, commonly used in wreaths, can cause severe stomach problems, seizures and respiratory failure.

Decorating dangers

  • Icicles and tinsel: If swallowed, these can irritate the digestive system. They may contain lead and tin, which can be toxic if swallowed repeatedly. In addition, they can cause stomach blockages in dogs and cats.
  • Fireplace crystals: These colorful crystals look like candy, but can contain harmful metals like copper and arsenic. If swallowed, they can irritate the mouth and stomach, and burn the mouth and throat. Swallowing large amounts can cause heavy metal poisoning.
  • Gift wrap: Some foil and colored gift wraps contain lead. Don't let your baby chew on them.

Other holiday hazards

  • Batteries: Don't let children play with disc batteries that are used in watches, cameras and games. If swallowed, they can stick to the throat or stomach, causing serious burns as the acid leaks out. If dogs chew on batteries, they too can get acid burns in their mouths.
  • Alcohol: Alcohol poisoning increases during the holidays. Don't leave partially filled glasses where kids can reach them.
  • Cigars and cigarettes: Even if you live in a smoke-free house, you may decide to make an exception Vilitra for holiday guests. Children have eaten whole cigarettes and cigars, as well as cigar and cigarette butts. This can cause vomiting, sweating and seizures. Keep all ashtrays out of the reach of curious little hands.
  • Chocolate: Too much chocolate isn't good for kids, though hardly toxic. It's different for pets, though. Chocolate can be fatal to animals, especially dogs. If you notice vomiting, nervousness, loss of balance, seizures or coma, get immediate medical attention for your pet.


09/7/2021 4:12 AM9/7/2021 4:12 AMNo
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